Phillip O'Sullivan 4th Year Fine Arts Hons Studio

Art Influences; From Expressionism to Surrealist Minimalism and Back Again.

 

First Studio III/IV 2014

Art was like schematic symbols that I had hoped to introduce figures into such as with Cenotaphii 2014.

Now the idea is to start with figures in a landscape or roomlike setting and introduce figures in reverse order from the prior procedure.

To create a grand opera of figures interacting within a semiologigical system of culture, ideology and feminist matriarchy or of a potential masculist 'future' world. Which i hope is someday soon for all our sakes.

 MacLeod has his figures trudging through the landscape, 'appearing', happening or just being there.

Julien Spianti figures on the other hand interact visually with their surroundings in less than a naturalistic way. It is artificial. The interaction is false or forced. It is not natural. Alienated as much of our city life is. For that matter too so is our life with nature, the natural or with 'natural' cultural signs, symbols or the semiologics of culture or liberal democratic civilization. We bear an unnatural relationship to our cultural symbols. They sit uneasily with us. We have them; they us. We speak to them and around them. They are not us. We believe them, yet not hold them as dear as a tribal culture. We hold them loosely. They cling to a memory we discard.

Much like Euan MacLeod and the other artists below.

I hope to create a problematised memory full of an operatic richness; or alluding to that possibility. In my final studio months only a sketch of possibility can be achieved.

i intend to reverse the schematic diagramming of a semiology of cultural masculist signs; from the signs 'out' to the signs 'in'. Working from a landscaped/interior with figures... in a seemingly traditional, but abstract (expressionist) depiction overlaid by an intersecting/ intruding set of overt cultural artifacts. Symbols depicted as real items of indoor 'natural' furniture; no matter how 'floating in the air' they may be. The cultural elephant within the room of nature and natural depictions; both/troth.

As 'both' implies two; yet I want to imply three or four layers of interaction. As in the age of Photoshop, where our many layered existence is culturally possible, I wish to implicate an intersecting 'cubiste' real;-world existence so that our sign systems are our dearest companions and our most familiar if operatic ghosts; thus a post-contemporary masculist influence can be created and reformed on the basis of its negations, cancelations and oppositions.

 depiction ART INFLUENCES 2014  MASSEY UNIVERSITY ART SCHOOLSTUDIO IV

 Euan MacLeod Description Climbers  2011  oil on canvas  137 x 180 cm

 

Euan MacLeod

Climbers

2011

oil on canvas

137 x 180 cm

  Euan MacLeod Description Surfing  2008  oil on canvas  51 x 38 cm

two

Euan MacLeod

Surfing

2008

oil on canvas

51 x 38 cm

  Euan MacLeod Description Blue boxer  2013  oil on polyester  51 x 38 cm

 

Euan MacLeod

Blue boxer

2013

oil on polyester

51 x 38 cm

 Euan Macleod COLOSSUS

Euan Macleod

COLOSSUS

  Euan MacLeod Description Grey smoking landscape  2013  oil on polyester  56 x 76 cm

f

Euan MacLeod

Grey smoking landscape

2013

oil on polyester

56 x 76 cm

   Size: 51.2 H x 38.2 W x 1.2 in  running time in museum of moscow, tretiakov gallery

 

Julien Spianti

Size: 51.2 H x 38.2 W x 1.2 in

running time in museum of moscow, tretiakov gallery

 

seven

 

Showcase

By Kalina Danailova

 

noine

 

ten

 

 
Online Art Boom

The value of the online fine art market is expected to more than double to $3.76 billion in the next five years as it increasingly attracts younger and first-time buyers, British insurer Hiscox said on Monday.

Online art sites do not threaten galleries and auction houses in the same way Internet availability has undermined the traditional movie, book and music businesses, Hiscox said.

But the willingness of younger buyers to make their first purchases over the Internet along with the rapid growth of online sites pointed to the future of the sector, it said in a statement.

"Young collectors are looking for art work which is easy to buy and available at a wide range of prices," Robert Read, Hiscox's head of fine art, was quoted as saying.

"Online art platforms cater for all tastes and budgets, but are particularly effective for those just starting to collect - opening up the art market in a way that is hard to replicate in the real world."

London-listed Hiscox, which underwrites cover for oil rigs, kidnappings, fine art and vintage cars, estimated the value of global online art sales at $1.57 billion in 2013.

In its second annual report on the online art market, in conjunction with market research company ArtTactic, Hiscox projects this figure will grow to $3.76 billion in 2018.

The report's findings are based on a survey of 506 international art buyers on ArtTactic's client mailing list, Twitter and Facebook, Hiscox said.

"Based on these figures, online art buying accounts for 2.4 percent of the estimated value of the global art market, which in 2013 was $65 billion," Hiscox said.

Internet retail giant Amazon had launched its Art portal in the past year and online auction house eBay was reportedly planning a rival platform, it said.

"Significant increased investment into platforms like Paddle8, Artsy and Artspace indicates continued confidence from investors and belief in the long-term potential of these businesses," Hiscox said.

COMPLEMENTARY BUYING OPPORTUNITIES

Online-only sales would not replace galleries, auctions and other traditional sales channels, it said, but provide an alternative buying opportunity and additional revenue stream.

"The findings indicate that online art e-commerce will not exist as a separate entity - it will augment and co-exist with what is happening in the real, physical art world," Hiscox said.

The report did find, however, that future generations of collectors were likely to make their first art purchases online, with almost 25 percent of 20- to 30-year-olds surveyed for the report saying they first bought art online without seeing the physical piece.

Although 39 percent of respondents said buying art online was less intimidating than at a gallery or auction, having a bricks-and-mortar presence instilled confidence, with 90 percent of online buyers purchasing from a physical space before turning to websites.

Limited edition prints were a popular entry point for online buyers, the report said, with 55 percent of those surveyed having bought a print online in the last 12 months.

The report found that 44 percent of buyers said they had spent more than 10,000 pounds ($16,800) purchasing art and collectibles online so far, with 21 percent of this group saying they had spent in excess of 50,000 pounds.

Nevertheless, seeing the physical object remained important, with 82 percent of those surveyed saying the most difficult aspect of buying art online was not being able to inspect it.

- Reuters

 

Websites are the way to Go!

 

A R Penke

Sigmar Polke

Charles Burchfield

Antoni Tapies

Miro

Yves Tinguely

Jasper Johns

Rauschenberg

Arshile Gorky

Dada

Surrealism

Expressionism

 Aboriginal 'skeletal' (see-through) artworks X-ray

MWO- Conspiracy theory

Critical theory- especially critical critiques of 'crit theory'.

Postmodern layering concepts from Photoshop

Sigmar Polke Samson and Delilah Working in a wide range of styles.

Sigmar Polke Male Figure

Sigmar Polke, Untitled (Male Figure)

Sigmar Polke

 

Sigmar Polke, Untitled (Dots)

Sigmar Polke

 

Sigmar Polke, Untitled

Sigmar Polke

Sigmar Polke, Damen-Ringkämpfe (Ladies Wrestling)

Sigmar Polke

Sigmar Polke, Biskuitrolle (Biscuit Roll)

Sigmar Polke

Sigmar Polke, Untitled

Sigmar Polke

 

Sigmar Polke, Untitled (Heron)

WOW

 

 

WOW

 

 

Art Statement: Notes

 

 

Phillip O’Sullivan

NOTES

In 2008 Malcolm Gladwell wrote a book called Outliers in which he postulated the theory that geniuses almost always worked harder, and longer at what they did as compared to others. And generally an expert level status was achieved when that artist had worked for 10,000 hours in their discipline

 

1Early life Bio 1967 Hamilton Art Gallery

 

 

Klee Notebooks

Concerning the Spiritual in Art Kandinsky

Varieties of Religious Experience Charles Burchfield agitated nature mysticism from Thoreau

Rousseaus Emile Genet Collette Mondrian Newman

Anton Ehrenzweig  the Hidden Order of Art

Erich Fromm   Jung Adler Carl Rogers    Rilke Baudelaire  Apollonaire Thoreau Walden Pond Goethe Sorrows of Werther Colin Wilson Sartre Camus Kierkegard Heiddegger Wittgenstein Russel Strason Newtown Isaac Asimov Scientific American Soviet Union  Paper Run Marist Rugby

 Picasso  Matisse Miro Antoni Tapies  Richard Diebenkorn Ad Reinhardt Al Held Charles Burchfield.

Otago 1969

 

Ilam 45 years born 1949

 

Phil Clairmont Cliff Mc Pherson Tony Fomison Gail ?Adams

 

Don Peebles William Sutton Rudi Gopas Tom Taylor Kurasek Doris Lusk

 

Expressionism

 ...........................

 

Minimalism

 

............................

 

Exhibitions select

 

1980's Wellington Melissa Clarke Reynolds Elizabeth Jeory

 

Vivienne Jepsen  Elizabeth Knox Shakespeare soc  Mark Williams  2009   Jane  Stafford

 

 

 

Art School

 

Simon Morris Maddie Leach  Peter Mc Leavey Petar Vuletic Phillipe Hamilton

 

Ian Scott  Richard Killeen Geoff Thornley Milan MrKusich Gordon Walters Stephen Bambury

 

Getting to the bottom of things Who runs the world.? 3 years ago google  6 website two religious with over one million hits unique visits.  Artlook  artmuseum poscom philliposullivan.com

Ideological reflexivity = political Jui Juistsu   close combat/infighting holding the belt of opponent.

Awkward cuss, difficult.

Research Topics in Painting Proposal

 2013

Martin: Year Three.

Catachresis: Dealing With the Awkward

 Notes toward a suspicion.

1- Politically Incorrect, Embarrassing or Taboo Subjects in Art

Politics: Who Runs the World? Beyond  Capitalism. Beyond the Left Right divide.  Cutting edge critique

  Solution concept: LEFT too much reading of their own untested ideas, probably impossible to pay for, implemented only at point of gun so renders itself invalid. Mistake in human psychology. And if/as in total error have no way out as unread in other intelligent solutions: including the religious sabbatarian one, from the Talmudists own Torah tradition. (disallowed by prior prejudgement: thus untried).

 Paintings to include this 7 based/49 year redemption system as reference in some form now and again.

The Trillionaires are behind the scenes who seldom appear, and who create private currency out of nothing: Financing both Capitalism and Communism.

   Avoiding these and vaguely ‘blaming’ the ‘patriarchy’ (which doesn’t exist in the sense below) merely impugns all masculist men and denies their contribution. Patriarchy has no texts and does not ‘know its own name’: no reflectivity of its being under contestation from past: in contrast to Dominant Matriarchy which does know that over against which it exists. One has crude primitive existence: the other knows with which it contends. Responding counter Masculism is entirely new therefore. Masculism in this form has extremely few texts: but it is growing.

Satanic: Demonically inspired? Worshippers of Spirits,  Pergemon. Babylonian? Talmudic atheists: Devil worshippers.

Remembering  Communism once considered  ‘conspiracy theory’.

2 – Masculism: the newest gender perspective.

3 - Ignoriance and the deliberate and hidden bigotry within Intellectual bourgeoisie.

5- Method: large drawing on paper/photocopies plus drawing and painting. Mounted on board or canvas rolls. Website: masculist-art.com

www.philliposullivan.co.nz

 

Phillip O'Sullivan

http://www.500letters.org/form_15.php

Phillip O'Sullivan (°1949, Palmerston North, New Zealand) makes paintings, photos, drawings and media art. With Plato’s allegory of the cave in mind, O'Sullivan makes work that deals with the documentation of events and the question of how they can be presented. The work tries to express this with the help of physics and technology, but not by telling a story or creating a metaphor.

 

His paintings doesn’t reference recognisable form. The results are deconstructed to the extent that meaning is shifted and possible interpretation becomes multifaceted. By rejecting an objective truth and global cultural narratives, he creates with daily, recognizable elements, an unprecedented situation in which the viewer is confronted with the conditioning of his own perception and has to reconsider his biased position.

 

His work urge us to renegotiate painting as being part of a reactive or – at times – autistic medium, commenting on oppressing themes in our contemporary society. By applying abstraction, he creates intense personal moments masterfully created by means of rules and omissions, acceptance and refusal, luring the viewer round and round in circles.

 

His works are an investigation into representations of (seemingly) concrete ages and situations as well as depictions and ideas that can only be realized in painting. Phillip O'Sullivan currently lives and works in Wellington.

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Phillip O'Sullivan   3228

 

Phillip O'Sullivan (°1949, Palmerston North, New Zealand) makes paintings, photos, drawings and media art. With a conceptual approach, O'Sullivan seduces the viewer into a world of ongoing equilibrium and the interval that articulates the stream of daily events. Moments are depicted that only exist to punctuate the human drama in order to clarify our existence and to find poetic meaning in everyday life.

 

His paintings question the conditions of appearance of an image in the context of contemporary visual culture in which images, representations and ideas normally function. By emphasising aesthetics, he tries to approach a wide scale of subjects in a multi-layered way, likes to involve the viewer in a way that is sometimes physical and believes in the idea of function following form in a work.

 

His works sometimes radiate a cold and latent violence. At times, disconcerting beauty emerges. The inherent visual seductiveness, along with the conciseness of the exhibitions, further complicates the reception of their manifold layers of meaning. By studying sign processes, signification and communication, he makes work that generates diverse meanings. Associations and meanings collide. Space becomes time and language becomes image.

 

His works directly respond to the surrounding environment and uses everyday experiences from the artist as a starting point. Often these are framed instances that would go unnoticed in their original context. Phillip O'Sullivan currently lives and works in Wellington.

 

========================

 

 

Phillip O'Sullivan

 

Phillip O'Sullivan (°1949, Palmerston North, New Zealand) makes paintings, photos, drawings and media art. By examining the ambiguity and origination via retakes and variations, O'Sullivan uses a visual vocabulary that addresses many different social and political issues. The work incorporates time as well as space – a fictional and experiential universe that only emerges bit by bit.

 

His paintings bear strong political references. The possibility or the dream of the annulment of a (historically or socially) fixed identity is a constant focal point. By putting the viewer on the wrong track, he tries to increase the dynamic between audience and author by objectifying emotions and investigating the duality that develops through different interpretations.

 

His works are given improper functions: significations are inversed and form and content merge. Shapes are dissociated from their original meaning, by which the system in which they normally function is exposed. Initially unambiguous meanings are shattered and disseminate endlessly. By merging several seemingly incompatible worlds into a new universe, he seduces the viewer into a world of ongoing equilibrium and the interval that articulates the stream of daily events. Moments are depicted that only exist to punctuate the human drama in order to clarify our existence and to find poetic meaning in everyday life.

 

His works sometimes radiate a cold and latent violence. At times, disconcerting beauty emerges. The inherent visual seductiveness, along with the conciseness of the exhibitions, further complicates the reception of their manifold layers of meaning. By emphasising aesthetics, he tries to create works in which the actual event still has to take place or just has ended: moments evocative of atmosphere and suspense that are not part of a narrative thread. The drama unfolds elsewhere while the build-up of tension is frozen to become the memory of an event that will never take place.

 

His works never shows the complete structure. This results in the fact that the artist can easily imagine an own interpretation without being hindered by the historical reality. Phillip O'Sullivan currently lives and works in Wellington.

 

MINIMALIST MONOGRAPH DRAFT   Phillip John O’Sullivan

Phillip O'Sullivan

 

Digital Image

 

'Seven Based Intuitive Composition'

 

2013

 

This work

notes jubilee 7x7 =49  Usury before capitalism 4000 years before Karl Marx

 

.............................

Phillip O'Sullivan began his artschool training at canterbury and flatted and shared studio and drug experiences and worked with Tony Fomison, Philip Clairmont and studied under Rudi Gopas, Don Peebles, Doris Lusk, in the early part of his career.

 

    In earlier years has exhibited in small gallery groups alongside Milan     Mrkusich, Gordon Walters and Richard Killeen. His shows were in an artists gallery cooperative also, a pioneer gallery sprung forth from the illustrious Petar Vuletic stable.Early on O'sullivan developed his own autere compositional schema, feeling disatisfied with the random and arbitrary Piet Mondriaan European minimalism of d'Styl and looked for a modal form that was scientifically consistent, as visually sensitive and precise as Mondriaan but could be reproducible as an underlying underpinning for any subsequent art composition. In those years his aesthetic decisions, assesements and judgements were entirely determined by how much something deviated or otherwise from his discoveries. It was something like Schoenbergs invention of the twelve tone scale, but in art. No New Zealand critic noticed or enquired after these discoveries so O'Sullivan began to incorporate these into his own later artworks.Minimalist Theory

 

Minimalist Seven Fold Scale Theory of Composition

 

Notes

 

Plan for this section

 

3 Websites philliposullivan.co.nz

Influences

....................................................................

 

Recent shows have been more 90's mixed in style, layering expressionism over graphic and abstract content. The artists online impact has been huge. Garnering over one million hits on several of his previous art websites with heavy sales of over a thousand drawings, sketches and smaller artworks. O'Sullivan has sold his dramatic paintings overseas to collectors in Austria, England, Germany, Holland and America.

  The Poet-Banker Leigh Davies and the lawyer Les Paris have been his main patrons in New Zealand. Every major private, corporate or public collection has bought examples of his work.

 

    Previously married, He has a son Leon who has a degree in Teaching and his grandson Finn who is just 19 & Granddaughter Gretta 17. Surviving Mother(89) lives in Tauranga.

 

Currently has work in progress at the Massey University Art School campus in Wellington.

O'Sullivan lineal in abstracts

 

     ART by Avenal McKinnon

 

      Phillip O'Sullivan abstract works on exhibition at Galerie Legard

 

      are essentially an expression of a Utopian vision.

 

      O'Sullivan taught by Campbell-Smith in Hamilton and Rudi Gopas

 

      at Canterbury University Art School, was based in Auckland from

 

      1970-1980 where he was connected with the group around Petar Vuletic.

 

      He had five exhibitions with the Petar/James Gallery from 1974 to 1977

 

      In 1980 he moved to Wellington and this is his first exhibition here.

 

      In terms of his reduction of the painting surfaces to a geometric

 

      structuring of line and colour, O'Sullivan appears to return to the

 

      fundamental formal abstractions of Mondrian and the Bauhaus group.

 

      Like them he uses a system of verticals and horizontals,

 

      primary colours and a harmony of light against dark

 

      Through simplicity of form he aims at purity and the ideal.

 

      His brief pencil sketches, like mathematical cyphers, reveal the

 

      analytical process of structuring his arrangements-a balance

 

      sought and directed by the artists intuition.

 

      But whereas the grids of Mondrian's abstractions

 

      reach from edge to edge like fragments from some

 

      greater order, O'Sullivan's bands never quite touch

 

      the borders of his frames as though emphasising

 

      an internalised, unattainable ideal.

 

      His intellectual framework of verticals and horizontals

 

      is humanised by areas of transparent overpainting

 

      and a merging of colours.

 

      Black blends into dark blue, hard whites blend

 

      into creamy canvas, matte areas into high gloss

 

      in a gesture of expansiveness.

 

      Where his horizontals and vertical bands intersect

 

      crosses are formed-Christian icons which hint

 

      at mysticism- a symbolic content reinforced

 

      by O'Sullivans titles: "St John of the Cross", "Spartacus"

 

      "Matauranga". Though not a Christian at the time and is not one now.

 

     Believing the church structures are so degraded and hidebound by their own

 

     traditions as to be sufficient to turn people off them.

 

       Nevertheless  a strong mystical bent prevails in his work.

 

      Phillip O'Sullivans art is a disciplined structuring of rhythm

 

      and proportion which reaches towards an ideal. It is an

 

      abstract art form which offers equilibrium and harmony.

 

     

 

       Evening Post  1983

 

 

 

 

 

Biography of the Artist

 

 

 

    Philip John James O'SULLIVAN

 

    Born October 4th, 1949, Palmerston North Son of former WWII Flying Officer Flt Lt Maurice Joseph O'Sullivan and Kent born Londoner Jenny Austin-Woodley

 

    EDUCATION

 

    1963 - 1967

 

    Fairfield College, Hamilton, William Forster, Headmaster, from Art School.     Campbell-Smith       Art      Teacher.

 

    1968 - 1969

 

    University Canterbury School of Fine Arts, 2nd year pass majors, Art History.

 

    1983 - 1986

 

    Victoria University of Wellington, Course BA English novel with units in Non-Western Music (Allen Thomas)& Film Studies( Russel Campbell ): classmates     Elizabeth Knox and Melissa Clark-Reynolds

 

    SELECTED EXHIBITIONS

 

    1972

 

    Works on Paper (with Milan Mrkusich)

 

    New Vision Gallery, Auckland

 

    Brian Quivoy Benefit Exhibition

 

    Waikato Art Museum 1977

 

    1973

 

    New Paintings,

 

    Petar/James Gallery, Auckland

 

    1974

 

    New Paintings

 

    Petar/James Gallery, Auckland

 

    1975

 

    Two Generations of Abstractions

 

    Pakuranga Art Centre

 

    Truth Tables

 

    Petar/James Gallery, Auckland

 

    1976

 

    Large Paintings

 

    Bosshard Galleries, Dunedin

 

    Work on Paper

 

    Petar/James Gallery, Auckland

 

    1977

 

    Gallery D.A.T.A. Inaugural Exhibition

 

    Gallery D.A.T.A., Auckland

 

    Young Contemporaries

 

    Auckland City Art Gallery

 

    Recent Paintings

 

    Gallery D.A.T.A., Auckland

 

    New Work on Paper

 

    Gallery D.A.T.A., Auckland

 

    1978

 

    Auckland Artists Festival exhibition,

 

    Auckland City Art Gallery

 

    Major Works/Masterworks.

 

    Gallery D.A.T.A., Auckland

 

    1979

 

    Major Works/Masterworks

 

    Bosshard Galleries, Dunedin

 

    Survey Exhibition

 

    Waikato Art Museum

 

    New Paintings

 

    Petar/James Gallery, Auckland

 

    1983

 

    Solo Exhibition

 

    Galerie Legard, Kelburn Wellington

 

    1984

 

    Birds Through a Ceiling of Alabaster

 

    Victoria University Library

 

    Regional Arts Exhibition

 

    Wellington City Art Gallery

 

    Solo Exhibition

 

    Galerie Legard

 

    1985

 

    The Ties That Bind (touring show)

 

    Wellington City Art Gallery

 

    Group Show of Gallery Artists

 

    Artis Gallery, Auckland

 

    Hand Painted Asymmetries

 

    Galerie Legard

 

    1986

 

    Paradox in Paint

 

    Brooker Gallery, Wellington

 

    1987

 

    Klein Bottles, Staircases, Heads

 

    Wellington City Gallery

 

    Selected Paintings

 

    Wairarapa Art Centre

 

    Recent Abstract Paintings

 

    Turnbull House Gallery, Wellington

 

    1988

 

    New Paintings

 

    Turnbull House Gallery, Wellington

 

    Studio Drawings

 

    Central Artspace, Wellington

 

    Figurative Paintings

 

    Warwick Henderson Gallery, Auckland

 

    1989

 

    Animal, Vegetable, Mineral

 

    Louise Beale Gallery, Wellington

 

    Idols of the Cave

 

    CSA Gallery, Christchurch

 

    1992

 

    Double Tuition with Violated Windows

 

    Christopher Moore Gallery, Wellington

 

    Group Show '92

 

    Christopher Moore Gallery, Wellington

 

    Small art for Christmas

 

    Christopher Moore Gallery, Wellington

 

    1993

 

    Parallel Number: paintings from the early 1980s

 

    Christopher Moore Gallery, Wellington

 

    1994

 

    Cloven Tongues

 

    Christopher Moore Gallery, Wellington

 

 

 

 

    AWARDS

 

    1981

 

    QE II Arts Council, Major Project Grant

 

    1981

 

    QE II Arts Council, Creative Project Grant

 

    1983

 

    QEII Arts Council, Special Project Grant

 

    PUBLICATIONS

 

    1984

 

    Philip O'Sullivan

 

    Making Connections

 

    (Statement accompanying the catalogue to his exhibition at the Victoria     University Library)

 

    1986

 

    Philip O'Sullivan

 

    Paradox in Paint

 

    (Statement accompanying the catalogue

 

    to his exhibition at the Brooker Gallery)

 

    1986

 

    Philip O'Sullivan

 

    Art and Morality

 

    (A self-published philosophy paper:

 

    A revision of a paper originally submitted for course requirements at Victoria     University)

 

    BIBLIOGRAPHY

 

    1979

 

    Max Germaine ed.

 

    Artists and Galleries of

 

    Australia and New Zealand

 

    p. 427

 

    Landsdownes Editions, Paul Hamlyn Pty Ltd. (Sydney)

 

    1984

 

    Exhibition Catalogue

 

    Regional Arts Exhibition

 

    entry # 106

 

    Wellington City Art Gallery

 

    1985

 

    Exhibition Catalogue

 

    Ties That Bind

 

    entry # 36

 

    Wellington City Art Gallery

 

    1986

 

    Elva Bett

 

    New Zealand Art: A Modern

 

    Perspective

 

    pp. 64, 68-69, 78-79 (illus), 208

 

    Reed Methuen (Auckland)     2002

 

    Kate McGahey

 

    The Concise Dictionary of New Zealand ARTISTS: Painters Printmakers Sculptors

 

    pp. ?90

 

    Gilt Edge Publishing

 

    HELD IN COLLECTIONS:

 

    Auckland City Art Gallery

 

    Bank Of New Zealand Collection (Peter McCleavey Consultant)

 

    National Art Gallery/Te Papa, Wellington

 

    State Services Collection, Wellington

 

    Victoria University of Wellington

 

    Waikato Art Museum, Hamilton

 

    Fletcher/Challenge Collection

 

 

 

    MISSION STATEMENT

 

    To foster Excellence wherever potential is found, to encourage the sensitive     and vulnerable talents, to challenge those students exhibiting boldness to     make breakthroughs in their work; to definitely explore possibilities of     commercial exhibitions for any hard working student with quality paintings or drawings. (1998)

 

 

 

    PERSONAL HISTORY

  

 

 In 1972 began to paint more monochromatic Tabula Rasa works, these seemed to me to be the most radical thing to do. Hailed by one critic as it 'had to happen here sometime' Ross ? the old painting was dead. How to carry on? What did painting itself want? The idea of things in 'itself' began to have an appeal. Could we ask the painting itself? Could we just stare at our compositions and they would give us the answer I began to look most closely. To scrutinise my opportunities; what would the painting say. Could it tell us something just by looking at it for answers. Would it behave. Would our exhausted eyesight suffer hallucinations, were there subtle vibrations to be picked up? I looked for hours.

 

 What did that miserable piece of paper say to me? What marks could I really make upon it, what horrendous shudders might I disturb its pristine, soon to be violated surface. Can I even hear its message. Would impossible odds reward a patient madness.

 

Text

 

Anecdote

 

Phillip O'Sullivan

 

Digital Image

 

'Seven Based Intuitive Composition'

 

2013

 

Phillip O'Sullivan

 

Digital Image

 

'Seven Based Intuitive Composition'

 

1973

 

 

 

Compositional Concerns

 

 

 

Medieval compositions as revealed in The Painters Secret Geometry interested the artist for awhile.

 

Golden section and rebates of the square seemed interesting; though the golden section looked obvious and overated. No more distinguished an idea as the photographers composition by thirds.

 

 

 

Asymmetry

 

Cantilever

 

Odd numbers =taste for fibonacci Mendelbrot etc all discarded.

 

 

 

Side trip into modern music schoengberg Webern Albsan Berg etc twelve tone scale atonal music Phillip Glass

 

 

 

 

Phillip O'Sullivan

 

Digital Image

 

'Seven Based Intuitive Composition'

 

2013

 

PORTFOLIO | ART STUDIO 2014 | BIOGRAPHY & C.V.

| BREAKTHROUGH PAINTINGS | STUDIO DRAWINGS 2 |

MASCULIST ART THEORY | INFLUENCES | VIDEOS |

ESSAY NOTES & REVIEWS | DRAWINGS | Works in Progress

 

 

 

 

 

 

influences

 

 

 

Barnet New man Mondriaan Choices or neither?

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Phillip O'Sullivan

 

Digital Image

 

'Seven Based Intuitive Composition'

 

2013

 

Minimalist history

 

Intellectual or mathematical cyphers

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Phillip O'Sullivan

 

Digital Image

 

'Seven Based Intuitive Composition'

 

2013

 

 

 

Intuition argument for input of sensibility

 

 

 

Phillip O'Sullivan

 

Digital Image

 

'Seven Based Intuitive Composition'

 

Artworks 1972 to 1981

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Minimalist Theory

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Phillip O'Sullivan

 

Digital Image

 

'Seven Based Intuitive Composition'

 

1974

 

 

 

Drawings as exploration

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Phillip O'Sullivan

 

Digital Image

 

'Seven Based Intuitive Composition'

 

1975

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Systematic investigation clocking in to studio

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Phillip O'Sullivan

 

Digital Image

 

'Seven Based Intuitive Composition'

 

1973

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Phillip O'Sullivan

 

Digital Image

 

'Seven Based Intuitive Composition'

 

1983

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Phillip O'Sullivan

 

Digital Image  T.S. Eliot

 

'Seven Based Intuitive Composition'

 

1980

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Cantilever balance that tends to imbalance order plus intuition Scott Ian= graphic sensibility

 

 

 

Thornley a well crafted sensuality seductive but no mental appeal it did not hold the mind but the eye.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Phillip O'Sullivan

 

Digital Image

 

'Seven Based Intuitive Composition'

 

1978

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

A reason for sensual intuitions coloured by intellectual visuality

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Phillip O'Sullivan

 

Digital Image

 

'Seven Based Intuitive Composition'

 

1981

 

 

 

Permutations avail once rigours  established

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Phillip O'Sullivan

 

Digital Image

 

'Seven Based Intuitive Composition'

 

2013

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Varietal in the singular moment; poetry of mathematical logic and feeling

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Phillip O'Sullivan

 

Digital Image

 

'Seven Based Intuitive Composition'

 

2013  Digital Remaster Video

 

 

 

Video dialogue transcript.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Phillip O'Sullivan

 

Digital Image

 

'Seven Based Intuitive Composition'

 

2013 Print of 1980s work

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

New works

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Phillip O'Sullivan

 

Digital Image

 

'Seven Based Intuitive Composition'

 

2013

 

 

 

Work at Massey

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Conclusion

 

Future plans

 

pyramid zionopteria

 

overlaps

 

economics

 

maths

 

examples plans

 

99214767

Phillip O’Sullivan  71 Waripori Street  Berhampore  Wellington 6023

907 4321

This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

RESEARCH METHODS IN ART

My Reasons for Painting: NOW

My art is about finding a theory and a practice for a masculist position in Art.

My art and masculist art theory website, masculist-art.com is mostly concerned with this. I compare my efforts in this direction as equivalent to 'early days' New Zealand Feminist magazine Broadsheet. So all efforts so far are raw, basic and probable too widespread. Nevertheless after forty decades of modern fierce feminism anomalies have shown up and need to be addressed in art, artworks and a sound, well rounded masculist cultural theory. The rudiments are beginning: for Masculism is the only ideology for men, by men, about men that knows it is under contestation (like feminism) and yet knows to be proud of its own gender and name. A fully self-cognisant Patriarchy is being born! The old one was relaxed and unguarded, it did not even consider its musings, considerations or speculations could be any other than what it luxuriated in. Today is far, far different.

 

The reason why men when they do the foulest jobs, as a group, may always be deserving of more money is that it is mostly men who do the really dangerous, loud, dirty, remote, high-up, stressful, low-down, high risk and inconvenient jobs. All this despite thirty six years of progressive feminism. The person who risks life and limbs for others deserves more recompense than someone in cosier conditions doing the same thing. Paying the cosy, more than, or, ‘the same’, on ideological principle, than the life-risking outside worker is unfair discrimination. Everywhere you look in the outside world men have created it with their minds, hands, arms, muscles and backs. We deserve far better respect than that which feminism accords us. Men are Angry!

My work is to give expression to this.

 

Phillip O'Sullivan        2013

PORTFOLIO | ART STUDIO 2014 | BIOGRAPHY & C.V.

| BREAKTHROUGH PAINTINGS | STUDIO DRAWINGS 2 |

MASCULIST ART THEORY | INFLUENCES | VIDEOS |

ESSAY NOTES & REVIEWS | DRAWINGS | Works in Progress

 

 

 

Just some notes on Jewish concerns.

 

We have been silent/silenced? on Jew-ish affairs now for over fifty years.

 

New Zealand forbade David Irving from speaking- a grave intellectual bigotry if ever there was one.

 

I believe he is wrong but we should not have forbidden him to make his points. That is to indulge in the things feared or spoken of or even forbidden. Though it did speak loudly of Jewish minority control of our collective mindset... that really did concern me.

 

And got me thinking on the whole Jewish question.

 

Who are they (to tell us what to do) think or say. Is there media control?

 

 

 

I claim to be part Hebrew myself: this trumps a mere one twelth of Israel I think. As 'Jew' is Jew-ish, note that... '-ish' meaning 'calling themselves Jew but they are not'... just Jew-ish? Shades of Khazaria, I think, slightly.

 

 

 

I believe many died in WWII, as my father flew overhead in the RNZAF: and my Grandfather below in a Stalag POW since Dunkirk.

 

He returned from the war lost in his own big suit as weighing less than six stone; 10 or twelve would be normal. Early newsreels all talk of typhoid, typhoid in camp after camp with the complete breakdown of German supplies. In his camp many people died from it, as at such low weights of body, anything, like pnuemonia, influenza etc could carry you away to the grave. Same just in the weeks after liberation many continued to die. Despite the best efforts of Allied soldiers and doctors.  None of this was the distinct result of deliberate German policy. As a boy the figure repeated to us was the litany of 'four million'. So my thoughts are tempered with these considerations.

 

After all, in the viscious reparations extracted from Germany post the first world war Auschwitz like conditions prevailed for many years: rampant evil starvation even as Germany shipped food overseas for war debts. Many as skin and bone. From the twenties on into the late thirties Germans heard of a dynamic new menace rapidly arising out of Russia: terror on a vast scale, 20 million slaughtered innocents, normal citizens in any other country, peasants, doctors, accountants, shopkeepers, grocers, managers, administrators, public servants, artists, students,professors, all murdered because of politics; without weapons, or defences of any kind; rounded up and shot, sent to the gulag where they died like flies, a sentence of death. Concentration camps, invented by the British in the Boer war, perfected by the Jewish led Bolsheviks (fifty percent of Bolshevik leaders were Jews). With this horror on their Prussian doorstep what were germans to think? Communists too were active in Bavaria, Berlin and in much of her territory. Many of these Jewish. The Jews were thought active in the heavy penalties placed on German society. All was in place for an environment of exacting similar. In short the Germans were less vile than the Bolsheviks on just big numbers alone. Think, twenty millions before WWII!

 

Then who really caused the second war? It almost had to happen.

 

Though revenge and death are never their own justification.

 

A plague on all of them.

 

PORTFOLIO | ART STUDIO 2014 | BIOGRAPHY & C.V.

| BREAKTHROUGH PAINTINGS | STUDIO DRAWINGS 2 |

MASCULIST ART THEORY | INFLUENCES | VIDEOS |

ESSAY NOTES & REVIEWS | DRAWINGS | Works in Progress

 

 

.............................................................................

 

 

 

Today, If there are the 'hidden hebrews' as I believe then there are upwards of 220 million of us. I would really like the right of return to see Israel, even if it is an illegitimate mossad/sturm gang/black opps/ khazarian state (which I do believe it ALSO is) for many are sincerely Jewish culturally if not in a true religious sense.

 

 

 

All the arabs are of semitic origin, so we must hope for their return to Father Abraham and the Patriarch Noah.

 

 

 

Jew is a nickname for Judah, ONe of 12 tribes of Israel.

 

If Judah is important Why not also Issachar Reuben Naphtali Judah Simeon dan Benjamin Gibeon Levi Ephriam/Manessah ( half tribes) Joseph and so on. Aramaic too, and Samaritans.

 

 

 

Notes below suggest further, deeper involvements in Jewish/ Irish issues.

 

 

 

Fair to say I am NOt a 'British Israelite' or even a Gaelic one though many ancient words in Gaelic have an Hebrew origin.

 

In the scattering of tribes all parts of the world were involved in diaspora...

 

... is there not Shinar in Genesis? Where Shinar is China: and the old Emperors of China travelled a ceremonial road (only later called the silk road) to the borders of Shinar/China to sacrifice a perfect red bull in the direction of Jerusalem. From the Temple of Heavenly peace every seven years towards the place of true honour, the Temple in the City of Gods Jehovan Peace, Jerusalem.

 

 

 

 

 

My own History: In Auckland we knew David Auburn son of Doctor Auburn who gave his Rembrandt etchings collection to the Auckland City Art Gallery. My sister Kathyryn had a Jewish boyfriend who wanted to marry her: his folks forbade it. We had only a hazy notion of what being Jewish meant. A neighbour Mrs Goldstein here in Berhampore had a tattoo number on her arm. Many Polish Jews and old Catholics migrated here to reside in Berhampore: there is a local Polish Association in Newtown of three stories, so quite a substantial population supporting it.

 

 

 

 There are two notions of chosen that can be interpreted: special as is taken on behalf of the Jews today.

 

Or, 'ensample' as in the KJV an interpretation I prefer as it is more humble. They are a sample nation, to other nations, what will happen to her will equally happen to your nation if you do the same or similar. Therefore for good or ill she is no better than anyone else, a vastly different view from the prideful zioniste position.

 

We shall see what God will do. Keeping in mind Revelation 11, significantly smack in the middle of that final 22 chapter prophecy.

 

 

 

 

 

All the best

 

 

 

 

 

Phillip John O'Sullivan 'Hidden Hebrew 99214767'

 

 

 

 

=====================

 

NOTES

 

Claim to be part Hebrew myself requesting 'right of return 'J even from an israel that might be illegitimate

 

 

six million / versus hidden hebrew 220 million ; back track extrapolate means 220 million as important today as America Lord did really bless them since Egypt

 

 

shemite palestineans arabs islam as part xtian/ part jewish sect

 

 

babylonian jews talmudic zionists even professors in israel now condemn zionism against fellow semites lucifer Pergamon stone recently purchased 'where Satan had his throne/seat'

 

 9/11 mossad plot exodus leon uris' book Sturm gang terrorists.

 

Haifa harbour false flag operation = mossad zionist handi-work/job

 

jews

  Jew Jewish

 

Nickname Judah

  origin

 

Adam-Eve/ humankind/ Jacob Isaac...Hebrew   Noah Shem/semites

 

Judah Issachar Reuben Naphtali Judah Simeon dan Benjamin gibeon Levi Ephriam manessah half tribes Joseph

 

 

ashkenazi russian Modern Isreal 'Call themselves Jews and they are not'

 

Rev 11 Sodom

 

 

Let His blood be on us and on all our children (forever?)

 

 

However Blessings for Isreal = ? equally to balance that

 

 

Ezekiel? vision

 

After Gog= 1000 year Kingdom of gods Reign on Earth.

 

 

Look upon him they who pierced him ... weeping

 

Jew and, 'JEW-ish': ie, not a jew but jew-ish, like a near-jew yet not claiming to be quite a hebrew tribal full blooded jew

 

Geaneology of Jesus begat= Patrilineal: yet claims to be king of Jews (indirectly) he does not disavow it.

 

Ask an Israeli if He is HEBREW? He cannot answer- as he knows he is not.

 

 

they'll realize they're being challenged

 

 

My own History

 

 

 dr Auburn David wife

 

Jew Boy Kathy we loved him smalkl forbidden to marry my sioster.

 

Lady uo Road Mrs Goldstein had number

 

Finkelstein

 

David Irving

 

Jesus curse Scattered.

 

Synagogue of satan==

 ashkenazim, seraphidim hassidim samaritan

 

 

hosen or example nation? test? god alone is special ie good.

 

 

 

 

> To: Taylor Wagstaff, Nick Clitheroe, Rebekah Boyland, Anya Gladstone, Yana Brewster, Mandy Boyd, Mayke Blom, Bex Fisher, Jillian Whitmore, Pauline Autet, Kirsten Wallace, Sophie Goodwin, Michelle Foley, Greg McClean, Sophia Gambitsis, Elisabeth Pointon, John Fuller, Saskia Willox, Phillip O'Sullivan

 

 

Assignment:

 

 

 

What I want you to do is set up a schedule for your artistic working schedule (yes, artists also have schedules unfortunately). There is often a romantic notion that artists get to sit and dream all day, only to be interrupted by manic artistic outbursts. But this is generally not the case. All of the artists I know work a lot on their work, and by a lot I mean they often have a full time job, and still manage to work on their own work for at least 20 hours a week. This may sound crazy to you, but please keep in mind that this website is structured as a typical college level course, and students in physical colleges generally spend at least 15 hours a week in school. This is how you should approach your work schedule. As something physically which you “go to” and work for an allotted amount of time.

 

 

 

While it is great to shoot for the stars the first most important thing is to have realistic goals in place. If you can afford to only work 8 hours a week on your artistic work, then allot that amount of time to it. The following Statement of Intent sample below is merely a sample which is geared towards an average student. You can choose to try and work as much as possible, or you can also take it slower. One of the most important things to keep in mind is that you should have a physical schedule which you are held to. Put it up in a prominent space in your room and then check off all the days where you completed the task.  You can download a monthly calendar template here and print it out, or buy a nice planner if you wish to write about and update your tasks for each day of work.

 

 

 

The theory of 10,000 hours of work as a measure of genius.

 

 

 

I do not wish to scare you with the amount of work that is needed to achieve genius, but would like to offer the following theory as a guideline as to how much the “Masters of Art” generally worked before achieving their status.

 

 

 In 2008 Malcolm Gladwell wrote a book called Outliers in which he postulated the theory that geniuses almost always worked harder, and longer at what they did as compared to others. And generally an expert level status was achieved when that artist had worked for 10,000 hours in their discipline

 

 

 

““The curious thing about Ericsson’s study is that he and his colleagues couldn’t find any “naturals” – musicians who could float effortlessly to the top while practising a fraction of the time that their peers did. Nor could they find “grinds”, people who worked harder than everyone else and yet just didn’t have what it takes to break into the top ranks. Their research suggested that once you have enough ability to get into a top music school, the thing that distinguishes one performer from another is how hard he or she works. That’s it. What’s more, the people at the very top don’t just work much harder than everyone else. They work much, much harder.” (Gladwell, 2008)

 

 

 

Understanding this idea is very important if you want to progress as an artist. There is a common misunderstanding that artists are born, not made. But if we look throughout history we find thousands of examples of just the opposite. For instance, Mozart is often considered to be the definition of a “child prodigy” with natural talent. But did you know that Mozart was taught by his father who was a music teacher and pianist? He later became friends with one of the most powerful composers of the era (Haydn) by the age of 8, and had already toured the world, and played more concerts than artists 4 times his age. Of course there is also an element of luck and timing in all of this as well, however this isn’t an isolated example. Look at  Picasso, Raphael, Titian, Andy Warhol, etc. etc. for further examples. And you’ll find the same thing time, and time again. All of them spent a tremendous amount of time working on their art and many became apprentices at very young ages to older and more experienced artists.  So no, artists are not born (if anything they are born into the perfect era), they are made through hard work (which most artists enjoy doing, so you don’t have to call it “work”)

 

 

 

For those of you who wish to achieve master status you should be aware that it takes years, and years of work. If you managed to work 8 hours a day, every day, it would take four years to complete (Ironically the same time it would take to complete a Undergraduate degree). However, if you wish to set your goals a bit lower than there is nothing wrong with that. You should work at your own pace, and this course is designed for you to do it whenever you have time. I have set forth the following weekly work schedule as a good starting point for those who wish to dramatically increase their drawing and painting skills. I’ve seen a simple schedule such as the one below work many times over the years. If you don’t give up, or lose patience I assure you that you can reach your goal if you are willing to persevere.

 

 

 

Sunday: 5 Hours (Painting)

 

Monday: 2 Hours (Drawing from Observation)

 

Tuesday: 2 Hours (Artist Research/History)

 

Wednesday: 1 Hour (Drawing from imagination)

 

Thursday: 3 Hours (Life Drawing)

 

Friday: Free!

 

Saturday: 5 Hours (Painting)

 

 

 

Find a Life Drawing class in your community and start going. Take a sketchbook to a coffee shop and sketch the people there. Go to a park and draw trees. Make weird collages in photoshop and make drawings from them. Sketch when you’re on the metro. Sketch in the margins of your notebooks in class. Sketch on napkins at restaurants. Play Exquisite Corpse and other drawing games with friends. Draw your cat, your coffee mug, your boots, people on TV, your hand, your foot, or a corner of your room. There is never an excuse not to draw when we are all surrounded by objects that all have unique traits which, upon examination, are complicated and can increase your abilities. Trust me, if you draw every day, you’ll see huge improvements in your drawings over time. If you’re looking for tricks you won’t find them, you can only work them out yourself by practicing your craft daily.

 

 

 

One movement which I was a part of about 5 years ago was the Painting A Day project where many different artists created a painting every day and posted it to their blogs. For those of you who have blogs I highly recommend getting into the habit of updating them as much as possible. Not just with my assignments which are given but with your own creative visions and sketches. One of the most popular of these artists in the Painting a Day movement was Duane Keiser who since has stopped posting every day but still posts quite regularly small paintings of objects in his house. You can see one of his stop motion videos below, and visit his blog here.

 

 

 

So what else should go into your Artist Statement of Intent? Along with a schedule of how much time you can put aside for painting and drawing every day I’ve compiled a list of common questions which can help determine the path you wish to take and focus your true ambitions. These are questions which you should think about and write about in your blogs as you form your Statement of Intent. It is quite common for these questions to be asked during Foundation Year studies at many art universities throughout the world, and by thinking about them, and answering them, you can begin to reveal exactly what it is you wish to achieve.

 

 

 

Technique/Process

 

What types of techniques do you wish to incorporate into your work, and what type of processes are required to achieve the desired effect that you wish to crate?

 

 

 

Intent:

 

What do you want a viewer of your piece to take away upon “reading” your work? What ideas/feeling do you wish to transmit to your audience?

 

 

 

Content/Subject:

 

What is it that you wish to draw and paint? Are there themes which reoccur in your ideas and work?

 

 

 

Social/Cultural Concerns:

 

Are you interested in political or cultural concerns in your work? Can your work make a comment about society that can only be transmitted by a drawing or painting? What do you feel is the role of the artist, and do artists have a responsibility to make specific work for a specific audience?

 

 

 

Rules:

 

Are there any ethical rules which you wish to consider in your work? Do ethical or moral concerns prevent you from creating a specific work? If so, should they be ignored in order for you to realize your creative vision?

 

 

 

Function:

 

What is the ultimate function of your work, and why is paint the right medium to transmit your message?

 

 

 

Accessibility:

 

Should you limit the accessibility of your work because you find that self expression is more important? Or is it more valuable to create a painting which can be widely understood by a large portion of the population?

 

 

 

To make it even more clear just exactly what it is I’m asking from you. I’ve included the two following Statements of Intent as examples from which you can draw from. The names of the students are imaginary, and the statements are of my own imagination. I’ve used the common required amount of independent work at the Foundation level which is 20 hours a week for three months. Which is a total of 240 hours. At the BA level this would be increased to 40 hours a week.

 

 

 

Student Name: Leonardo Cattawampus

 

Class: Painting-Course.Com

 

Teacher: Jer

 

Title: Creating Modern Day Americana paintings in the style of Norman Rockwell

 

 

 

First 6 Weeks

 

Work Schedule: – 20 hours a week.

 

Sunday: 5 Hours (Painting exercises)

 

Monday: 2 Hours (Drawing from Observation at a Cafe)

 

Tuesday: 2 Hours (Artist Research/History)

 

Wednesday: 2 Hours (Drawing from imagination/Composition) 1 Hour (Editing photos/sketches)

 

Thursday: 3 Hours (Life Drawing)

 

Friday: Free!

 

Saturday: 5 Hours (Painting exercises)

 

 

 

For the next three months I wish to explore the paintings of Norman Rockwell, how they were received by the general public, and what techniques, as well as ideas he used in the creation of his paintings. I plan on making one final painting in which I will integrate both the research I’ve accumulated as well as the techniques I’ve learned about. I also know that Rockwell was a great draughtsman and I must increase my drawing and painting abilities which is why I’ve devoted a large section of my weekly schedule to painting and drawing.

 

 

 

I plan on making preliminary sketches, and also look for modern day American scenes which would be suitable for a painting. Because of this much of my time will be spent outside of the studio in the public where I can both photograph and sketch from real life. After collecting a wide range of both photos as well as on site sketches I plan on incorporating them into a final painting which I plan on executing during the last month and a half.

 

 

 

Work Schedule for Week 7:

 

Sunday: 5 Hours (Painting exercises)

 

Monday: 2 Hours (incorporating sketches into composition)

 

Tuesday: 2 Hours (Drawing from composition)

 

Wednesday: 2 Hours (Drawing from composition) 1 Hour (reflection upon past successes and failures)

 

Thursday: 3 Hours (Life Drawing)

 

Friday: Free!

 

Saturday: 5 Hours (Painting exercises)

 

 

 

Work Schedule for Week 8

 

Sunday: 5 Hours (Begin transfer of sketches/drawings/photos to canvas)

 

Monday: 2 Hours (finish transfer of drawing to canvas)

 

Tuesday: 2 Hours (Begin Value Study on Canvas in black and white)

 

Wednesday: 2 Hours (Finish Value Study on Canvas in Black and White) 1 Hour (reflection upon past successes and failures)

 

Thursday: 3 Hours (Life Drawing)

 

Friday: Free!

 

Saturday: 5 Hours (Begin to match colors to value scale)

 

 

 

During these weeks I plan on finishing the composition as well as creating a finished drawing with a value study to use for painting. I wish to continue increasing my abilities as a draughtsman which is why I’ve kept the 3 hours of Life Drawing every Thursday. By the end of the second week the value scale drawing will have been successfully transferred to the canvas. I will then begin experimenting with color values which match those that have been laid out in the value study.

 

 

 

Work Schedule for week 9 – 12

 

Sunday: 5 Hours (Painting)

 

Monday: 2 Hours (Painting)

 

Tuesday: 2 Hours (Painting)

 

Wednesday: 2 Hours (Painting) 1 Hour (reflection upon past successes and failures)

 

Thursday: 3 Hours (Life Drawing)

 

Friday: Free!

 

Saturday: 5 Hours (Painting)

 

 

 

During this last month I wish to finalize the painting and work out the smaller details. I also plan on looking at my work and comparing it to Rockwell’s and examine how successful I was in recreating a modern day Rockwell. I’m hoping that the research I did on the artist and his time period will be helpful in making these realizations, and be apparent in the final work.

 

 

 

Anton Ehrenzweig Art Quotes - (5 quotes)

 

Anton Ehrenzweig - From the Abstraction category:

 

Abstract art has helped us to experience the emotional power inherent in pure form. (Anton Ehrenzweig)

Read more quotes about 'Abstraction'

 

Submit one or more quotes by Anton Ehrenzweig

 

 

Anton Ehrenzweig - From the Awareness category:

 

There comes a voluptuous moment when the senses and the whole skin tingle with a sharpened awareness of the body and the world around. (Anton Ehrenzweig)

Read more quotes about 'Awareness'

 

Submit one or more quotes by Anton Ehrenzweig

 

 

Anton Ehrenzweig - From the Immortality category:

 

The immortality of great art seems bound up with the inevitable loss of its original surface meaning and its rebirth in the spirit of every new age. (Anton Ehrenzweig)

Read more quotes about 'Immortality'

 

Submit one or more quotes by Anton Ehrenzweig

 

 

Anton Ehrenzweig - From the Modernism category:

 

It is perhaps due to the fact that our own modern art is often content to work from low irrational levels of the mind alone, that our civilization has become so receptive to the art of other civilizations... the complex diffuse substructure of all art. (Anton Ehrenzweig)

Read more quotes about 'Modernism'

 

Submit one or more quotes by Anton Ehrenzweig

 

 

Anton Ehrenzweig - From the Symbols category:

 

Superficially insignificant or accidental looking detail [in art] may well carry the most important unconscious symbolism. (Anton Ehrenzweig)

Read more quotes about 'Symbols'

 

Submit one or more quotes by Anton Ehrenzweig

 

 

PORTFOLIO | ART STUDIO 2014 | BIOGRAPHY & C.V.

| BREAKTHROUGH PAINTINGS | STUDIO DRAWINGS 2 |

MASCULIST ART THEORY | INFLUENCES | VIDEOS |

ESSAY NOTES & REVIEWS | DRAWINGS | Works in Progress

 

.........................................................................................

Phillip John O'Sullivan
Title
:   Naked Christ Submits To Death : Early StageDimension:  710mm X 957mm

Price: $3850

Date: 2013

Buy Now:   artpos@ymail   Paypal TM

 Contact:  Phillip O'Sullivan   This email address is being protected from spambots. You need JavaScript enabled to view it.

 

 

WOW

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Jonathan Lasker
S-145 untitled, 2011
oil and pigment pen on paper
6 x 8 inches

Jonathan Lasker 
S-156 untitled, 2012
oil and pigment pen on paper
6 x 8 inches

Jonathan Lasker
S-130 The Plan for Morality, 2009
oil and pigment pen on paper
6 x 8 inches

 

 

Jonathan Lasker

 

On developing a personal language/ motifs/ symbols

A discursive language of forms

Jonathan Lasker 
S- 134 untitled, 2009
oil and pigment pen on paper
6 x 8 inches

Campion
OSCAR RENE CORNEJO

OSCAR RENE CORNEJO

The Sacred

OSCAR RENE CORNEJO

Origins Retreat: Appearance Prevails

 

 

Seeing the development of any artists language

across the developments of their work.

 

 

 

 

© 2015 O'Sullivan Art Studio

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